Beta to RC Changes – Turning Windows Features On or Off

Les comparto este articulo, el cual informa de una caracteristica que ha sido mejorada en windows Vista se mejoro la capcidad de habilitar y deshabilitar componentes pero ahora ha sido reforzada en Windows 7: la lista se esta extendiendo, incluye cosas como


  1. Internet Explorer
  2. Gadgets de windows
  3. Windows media player
  4. entre otros más , sobre todo componentes de red.

con estos cambios será mucho más fácil tunear el sistema a tu antojo.

De por si Windows 7 ya es muy rápido, ahora con la posibilidad de deshabilitar más funcionalidades se podra llegar a límites antes no pensados.

Como siempre... sino saben ingles usen el traductor de google oel que deseen.


Beta to RC Changes – Turning Windows Features On or Off


The theme of “choice and control” has been applied in many aspects of how we have designed Windows 7. We’ve certainly received lots of positive feedback about the theme and about the choices we’ve made in the design, and we’ve also received a few suggestions for how we might continue to implement this theme in the future. We’ve received feedback for features that should be even more customizable (such as Explorer or the logon screen) or features that should be added to Windows (such as a PDF format reader, security tools, or disk utilities). And we’ve received feedback that some users might prefer to run Windows without certain features. This post is about a point of choice and control in the Windows 7 control panel called “Windows Features” which is where you can choose to turn various features of Windows on or off. This continues our discussion of changes we have made based on feedback from the Beta as we progress to the Release Candidate. This post is by Jack Mayo who is the group program manager for our Documents and Printing team and also worked on Internet Explorer 8. --Steven

“Turning Windows Features On or Off” has a long history in Windows, going back to the earliest days of the 32-bit code base. We’ve received a lot of suggestions about features that you would like to turn on or off using your own criteria for choice. For Windows 7 we’ve engineered a more significant list of features and worked to balance that list in light of the needs of the broad Windows platform as well.

We want to provide choice while also making sure we do not compromise on compatibility by removing APIs provided for developers. We also want to strike the right balance for consumers in providing choice and balancing compatibility with applications and providing a consistent Windows experience.

We know many have specific ideas of what constitutes a “feature” or a “program” in Windows and what constitutes an identifiable “part” of the operating system, and yet we also know different people can have different points of view, often strongly held. Some might take an end-user approach and identify a feature based on a window or start menu shortcut. Some might take an approach based on one perspective of architectural subsystems, such as storage or security.

Some might take an approach based on what to some are alternate choices to some similar functionality.

All of these are valid in some context, but would not result in consistently identifying “features” considering these varied points of view. As engineers we know that no software system can be decomposed into an arbitrary set of layers or parts and any decomposition is likely to change over time.

We don’t want the discussion about this feature or these choices to digress into a philosophical discussion about the definition of an operating system, which is ultimately a challenging exercise (judging by the revision history on the community page), but we do want to improve a feature centered on helping to meet the feedback expressed by some over the summer when this blog started.

In the Release Candidate for Windows 7 we have extended the control panel called “Windows Features” which is available from the standard “Programs and Features” control panel (we often call this ARP, for the original name of Add/Remove Programs). This location is unchanged from Vista and XP, though the wording has been clarified.

In Windows 7 if you bring up the Windows Features control panel by clicking on “Turn Windows Features on or off” (or just typing “Windows features” in the start menu) you will see the following in the Release Candidate (by default the hierarchy is not fully expanded, but in this screen shot I’ve expanded some elements for additional information):


For those familiar with the Vista version or the Beta version of this dialog you will notice the list has grown. Let’s talk about what we’ve added and briefly how it works.
If a feature is deselected, it is not available for use. This means the files (binaries and data) are not loaded by the operating system (for security-conscious customers) and not available to users on the computer. These same files are staged so that the features can easily be added back to the running OS without additional media. This staging is important feedback we have received from customers who definitely do not like to dig up the installation DVD.

For any of the features listed you can change the state to enable it or disable it. The Vista and Windows 7 beta control panel lists a wide range of features. Some are targeted towards Developers working on a client workstation (IIS, MSMQ, etc.), others are utilities for network administrators and enthusiasts (RSM, SNMP, Telnet, etc.), and some are features customers have asked us to make optional (Games, Fax and Scan, Tablet PC components).
In Windows 7 we are expanding the number of features you have control over in this regard, giving customers more control, flexibility and choice in managing the features available in this version of Windows. In addition to the features that were already available to turn on or off in Windows Vista, we’ve added the following features to the list in Windows 7:

  • Windows Media Player
  • Windows Media Center
  • Windows DVD Maker
  • Internet Explorer 8
  • Windows Search
  • Handwriting Recognition (through the Tablet PC Components option)
  • Windows Gadget Platform
  • Fax and Scan
  • XPS Viewer and Services (including the Virtual Print Driver)
It is worth describing the details of “remove” since this too is a place where there are engineering and customer decisions to be made. We’ve already seen one decision which is to make sure we keep the features staged for future use so that a DVD is not required. A second decision is that we also continue to support the APIs available for features where these APIs are necessary to the functionality of Windows or where there are APIs that are used by developers that can be viewed as independent of the component. As many of you know these are often referred to as “dependencies” and with Windows the dependencies can run both internal to Windows and external for ISVs.

It should be no surprise, but when we develop new features in Windows we tend to use the underlying infrastructure and associated APIs rather than duplicate code which would create extra working set, slow performance, and increase the surface area that needs to be secured, etc. We all know code reuse is a good engineering practice. As a platform, Windows tends to emphasize the creation of APIs for many systems, even when those subsystems are viewed as part of a larger system. When we have APIs that are used, we faced the choice of breaking software that just expected those APIs to be there or to continue to support the API.

When we continued to support the API our approach was to remove a feature by making sure that an end-user could not invoke the feature via traditional end-user mechanisms. These are often difficult decisions as we work to balance the expectations of developers, the shared desire to deliver a robust release of Windows 7, and to maintain the goals set out by the feature “Turn Windows Features On or Off”.

Because there are so many combinations of dependencies just represented in this list, selecting some options might provide you with some explanation as to the challenges in selecting a combination (for example Windows Media Player and Windows Media Center share a lot of code so turning one off might introduce a pretty complex situation for the average end-user).

Finally, we know some have suggested that this set of choices be a “setup option”. Some operating systems do provide this type of setup experience. As we balanced feedback, the vast majority of feedback we have received was to streamline setup and to reduce the amount of potential complexity in getting a PC running. We chose to focus this feature on the post-setup experience for Windows 7.
--Jack

Published Friday, March 06, 2009 12:00 AM by e7blog Filed under: Platform

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Logan.R7

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Barbaro, se les acabo el negocito a esas versiones "lite" que no causaban mas que problemas
 

Tr0nad0r

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Creo que las lite seguiran existiendo (nunca falta el que tiene ganas de correr un sistema operativo nuevo en un computador de hace diez años) y seguiran causando problemas :p


Por cierto saben que numero de build es la RC?
 

Logan.R7

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para mucahs cosas seguira siendo necesarios ciertos componentes de una aplciacion tipo navegador diria yo...
 

JuanKRuiz

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Que buena noticia, pero segun este articulo> Internet Explorer 8 podrá ser "desinstalado" de Windows 7
Del explorer solo se podra quitar el archivo ejecutable, pero quedaran algunos componentes que el sistema utiliza:muerto:, bueno pero por algo se comienza.
Te contesto como desarrollador...

En los comienzos de Internet Explorer (después de la versión 3 si mal no estoy) internet explorer y el explorador de windows se volvieron casi que uno solo, pues finalmente si yo quiero ver archivos en mi pc o en un FTP o un Finger en internet deberia utilizar el mismo programa, asi que microsoft permitia que desde el explorador de windwos se navegara en estos servicios de internet utilizando la interfaz grafica de Windows explorer.

Microsoft tambien vio que si windows Explorer servia para buscar direcciones de archivos pues tambien podia buscar direcciones web, asi que al ingresar una direccion web en Windows explorer , este automaticamente mostraba su contenido, de igual forma al ingresar una direccion local en Internet explorer este mostraba la informacion tambien.

Entonces ambos comenzaron a crecer utilizando elementos comunes, hasta que en cierto punto se puede decir que Internet Explorer era parte del sistema operativo porque Windows Explorer compartia con el practicamente todas las partes importantes salvaguardando algunas cosas ya muy propias de un navegador.

Así siguieron evolucionando y siempre han sido practicamente un mismo componente, un mismo programa.

Un programa no es solo un ejecutable, es un conjunto de librerias y APIs que desde luego microsoft puede reutilizar o compartir en cualquier otro componente del sistema como es el caso de windows explorer o la navegacion web a traves de office o los componentes de navegacion web que vienen con windows forms en visual Studio y un sin fin de cosas más.

Así que muchos de los componentes de Internet Explorer son realmente componentes de la API de Windows, razon por la cual remover explorer no es mas que quitar un ejecutable y unas cuantas librerias de su interfaz grafica y posiblemente de sus interpretes de scripts, pero no todas las librerias ni componentes que usa.
 

Logan.R7

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Evangelio de Juank - Capitulo IE8 - Versiculo 3 - Conceptos de desinstalacion XD, tenia la idea pero que buan explicación para no quedar con esa duda en el tintero.
 

Tr0nad0r

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Que buena noticia, pero segun este articulo> Internet Explorer 8 podrá ser "desinstalado" de Windows 7
Del explorer solo se podra quitar el archivo ejecutable, pero quedaran algunos componentes que el sistema utiliza:muerto:, bueno pero por algo se comienza.

Lo mismo ocurre en cualquier otro SO, hay muchos programas que necesitan renderizar HTML a parte del navegador. Por ejemplo en Linux/KDE tu puedes quitar el navegador Konqueror, pero no deberias quitar KHTML porque hay muchos otros programas que dependen de este. Imagino que lo mismo pasara con OSX y el Safari, puedes quitar el Safari pero no es recomendable que quites las librerias de WebKit porque es probable que algun otro programa falle.

Se hace de esta manera porque esto le facilita mucho la tarea a muchos desarrolladores que no tienen tiempo o no quieren tener que escribir una nueva libreria o motor de renderizado de HTML, cada vez que quieran hacer un programa que necesite hacer algo con HTML, por eso existen los componentes reutilizables (como las librerias del IE que no pueden ser quitadas del Windows)

Saludos :)
 

JuanKRuiz

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Ja, pues si va a participar le anticipo que va a pelear mucho porque hay una gente que sale con unas cosas .... que uno no sabe si reir, llorar, pegarles, tenerles compasion etc...
jajajaj

antes que no se han metido los bebes que joden por escribir en ingles....+


en fin

to all new arrivals... welcome.
 

ONIBAHAMUT

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bueno, a los que dudaban que microsoft podria hacerlo ahi esta, ahora habra que esperar para ver si este cambio forzado no probocara problemas nuevos en el windows y termine cajeteando lo que podria ser un exelente producto.

por otra parte, si todo saliera a pedir de boca, aria que pudieramos quitar mucha basurilla que a cada quien nos convenga. mmm hay que esperar a ver, je, en todo caso yo ya le estaria metiendo el fire fox recien instalar XD.
 

Hamtavirus

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bueno como que yo tenia razon de lo que tenian que dejar cosas que fueran descartables como el media center el diskeeper del windows, etc
 
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